The effects of an appreciation

An appreciation means an increase in the value of a currency. It means a currency is worth more in terms of foreign currency.

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A example of an appreciation in the value of the Pound 2009 – 2012

  • Jan 2009  If £1 = €1.1
  • June 2012 £1 = €1.27
  • In this case we can say there was a 15% appreciation in the value of the Pound against the Euro – between Jan 2009 and June 2012

 

Effects of an appreciation on the UK economy

  1. Exports more expensive. The foreign price of UK Exports will increase Europeans will find British exports more expensive. Therefore with a higher price, we would expect to see a fall in the quantity of UK exports.
  1. Imports are cheaper. UK consumers will find that £1 now buys a greater quantity of European goods. Therefore, with cheaper imports we would expect to see an increase in the quantity of imports.
  1. Lower (X-M) With lower export demand and greater spending on imports, we would expect fall in domestic Aggregate Demand (AD), causing lower economic growth.
  1. Lower inflation. An appreciation tends to cause lower inflation because:
    • import prices are cheaper. The cost of imported goods and raw materials will fall after an appreciation, e.g. imported oil will decrease, leading to cheaper petrol prices.
    • Lower AD leads to lower demand pull inflation.
    • With export prices more expensive, manufacturers have greater incentives to cut costs to try and remain competitive.

Impact of appreciation on AD/AS

http://www.economicshelp.org/images/macro/fall-AD.jpg

Assuming demand is relatively elastic, an appreciation contributes to lower AD (or a slower growth of AD), leading to lower inflation and lower economic growth.

Impact of an appreciation on the current account

Assuming demand is relatively elastic, we would expect an appreciation to worsen the current account position. Exports are more expensive, so we get a fall in eXports. Imports are cheaper and so we see an increase in iMports. This will cause a bigger deficit on the current account.

However, the impact on the current account is not certain:

  1. An appreciation will tend to reduce inflation. This can make UK goods more competitive, leading to stronger exports in the long term, therefore, this could help improve the current account.
  2. The impact on the current account depends on the elasticity of demand. If demand for imports and exports is inelastic, they the current account could even improve. Exports are more expensive, but if demand is inelastic, there will only be a small fall in demand. The value of exports will increase. If demand  for exports is price elastic, there will be a proportionately greater fall in export demand, and there will be a fall in the value of exports.
  3. Often in the short term, demand is inelastic, but over time people become more price sensitive and demand more elastic. It also depends what goods you export. Some goods with little competition will be inelastic. China’s manufacturing exports are more likely to be price sensitive because there is more competition.

Evaluation of an appreciation

  • Elasticity. The impact of an appreciation depends upon the price elasticity of demand for exports and imports. The Marhsall Lerner condition stations that an appreciation will worsen the current account if (PEDx + PEDm >1)
  • The impact of an appreciation depends on the situation of the economy. If the economy is in a recession, then an appreciation will cause a significant fall in aggregate demand, and will probably contribute to higher unemployment. However, if the economy is in a boom, then an appreciation will help reduce inflationary pressures and limit the growth rate.
  • It also depends on economic growth in other countries. If Europe was experiencing strong growth, they would be more likely to keep buying UK exports, even though they are more expensive. However, in 2012, the EU economy was in a recession, and therefore were sensitive to the increased price of UK exports.
  • It also depends why the exchange rate is increasing in value. If there is an appreciation because the economy is becoming more competitive, then the appreciation will not be causing a loss of competitiveness. But, if there is an appreciation because of speculation or weakness in other countries, then the appreciation could cause a bigger loss of competitiveness.

Is an appreciation good or bad?

  • An appreciation can help improve living standards – it enables consumers to buy cheaper imports.
  • If the appreciation is a result of improved competitiveness, then the appreciation is sustainable, and it shouldn’t cause lower growth.
  • An appreciation could be a problem, if the currency appreciates rapidly during a difficult economic circumstances.

    Rapid appreciation in 1979 and 1980 contributed to recession of 1980 – 81

    For example in 1979 and 1980, the UK had a sharp appreciation in the exchange rate, partly due to  thediscovery of North Sea oil. The value of the Pound increased from £1=$1.5 to £1 = $2.5. However, this appreciation was a factor in causing the recession of 1981 – which particularly affected UK exports and manufacturing.

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2 Responses to The effects of an appreciation

  1. real estate search February 22, 2014 at 10:16 am #

    the only problem with the appreciation is it makes the exports expensive which in turn will affect the economy after some years. so according to me the ratio of imports and exports must be maintained properly.

  2. Ringo March 31, 2014 at 11:03 am #

    will appreciation induce deflation ?

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