The True Level of Unemployment in UK

Readers Question: To what extent do the official UK figures for unemployment accurately reflect economic reality?


The government publish two unemployment statistics – the Claimant count and Labour Force Survey.

  • The Labour Force survey asks 60,000 whether they are actively seeking work.
  • The claimant count is the number of those receiving job seekers allowance.

The labour force is a better guide to unemployment because the claimant count only includes those eligible for benefits.

Another factor to consider is the extent of disguised unemployment. This is when people are not counted as unemployed, but they maybe moved on to sickness / disability benefits or work only part-time rather than full time. It can be useful to look at employment statistics as well as unemployment rates.

Claimant count and Labour Force survey measure of unemployment in UK

claimant-count-lfs unemployment

  • In Dec 2015, according to Labour Force Survey there were 1.69 million unemployed people (5.1% of the working population) – Labour force survey
  • In Dec 2015, according to Claimant count, there were 760,000 unemployed 2.2%
  • See: UK unemployment

The claimant count suggests we are close to full employment. However, despite theses figures, there are many reasons to suggest that this is an under estimate of unemployment

The JSA excludes many groups of people from claiming unemployment benefit, even though they are actively seeking work. Examples include:

  • A husband or wife whose partner is working and earning above a certain amount. i.e. JSA is means tested depending on a partner’s income. After 6 months it is also means tested depending on savings
  • People under 18 are not eligible – in theory they should be on training schemes
  • People who are not able / willing to sign on at job centre can lose benefits.
  • People over 55 are often excluded

The claimant count is not a good guide to measuring the real scope of unemployment because many are counted as unemployed, but they are not eligible for benefits.

Labour Force Survey

D7G7 unemployment

The Labour Force Survey is done according to internationally agreed criteria by the ILO. This survey is a monthly questionnaire of 60,000 people. It asks them whether they have been actively seeking work and would be able to take work if offered. The ILO method gives a significantly higher figure ( currently  1.69 million  Dec 2015) It is worth noting that the ILO questions stick close to the common economic definition of unemployment (actively seeking work) Therefore, this would be a better approximation of unemployment levels in the UK.

This is despite the potential for sampling errors in a survey of 60,000 people; also people may not tell the truth.

Other factors which influence true levels of unemployment

Economic inactivity

Economic inactivity is when people are considered to have left the labour force. They are neither working or counted as unemployed, e.g. long-term sick, students, early retirement.

In recent years there has been a marked increase in the number of people receiving sickness or disability benefits. These people used to be employed, but, for various reasons are no longer able to work. Rather than be classed as unemployed they have effectively left the labour force. In one sense they are not unemployed because they are not seeking work. However, on the other hand, you could argue this economic inactivity is a type of unemployment. Perhaps under different circumstances they could be working. Often sickness benefits disguise the extent of unemployment in certain areas. For example, many former miners were given sickness benefits, rather than be classed as unemployed when the mines closed down.

This types of unemployment is often known as hidden unemployment.

Disguised Unemployment

Disguised unemployment occurs when people do not have productive full-time employment, but are not counted in the official unemployment statistics.

For example, a person may want to work 40 hours a week. However, he might only be able to find part time work. Therefore, he is not classed as unemployed, but at the same time, he doesn’t have a full time job – we could say he is underemployed.


  • People on sickness / disability benefits (but, would be able to do some jobs)
  • People doing part-time work.
  • Zero hour contracts, where number of hours worked is less than wanted.
  • People forced to take early retirement and redundancy
  • Disguised unemployment could also include people doing jobs that are completely unproductive, i.e. they get paid but they don’t have a productive job.


Possible over estimation of unemployment

It is also possible that some people counted as unemployed are actually working. It is possible that people receive benefits but still work for ‘cash in hand’

However, the criteria are quite strict. Also, the Labour Force survey doesn’t rely on the numbers receiving benefits.

UK unemployment and output gap


A feature of the 2008-13 recession is that unemployment has fallen quicker than previous recessions. This is unusual in that unemployment is usually a lagging indicator (takes time). For example, after 1981 recession, it took many years to bring unemployment down.

This is due to factors such as

  • Lower wage growth making employment cheaper
  • Falling / stagnant productivity – meaning more workers are need
  • More flexible labour markets, firms able to employ on cheaper part-time contracts
  • A fall in the natural rate of unemployment.

See also: UK Unemployment mystery.


7 thoughts on “The True Level of Unemployment in UK

  1. A new understanding of capital is the key to problems like unemployment, et al. See the present essay to be updated shortly entitled TRANSFINANCIAL ECONOMICS, a new, and emerging paradigm in a process of research, and development.

  2. unemployment the wreck of economy and abject poverty,divorce streak and many catalyst of doom

Comments are closed.