List of National Debt by Country

  • This is a list of the gross National debt that countries have. National debt refers to the amount of total government debt a country has. This is also referred to as ‘public sector debt’.
  • It is compiled using data from the IMF, Eurostat and CIA agencies.
  • Note: National debt is different to ‘External debt‘ – External debt includes all the debts a country (both private and public sector) owe to foreigners.
  • Note: You may see slightly different figures for government debt levels, depending how it is measured. For example,
    •  In Q1 2014 – Net US debt was 74% (debt held by private sector). Gross US debt was 103% (this includes intra-governmental holdings
  • Updated October, 2014

List of National Debt by Country

General gross government debt. Mostly using CIA from April 2014.

Debt levels for 2013.

Pos Country Debt % of GDP Read more
1 Japan 226 Japan debt
2 Zimbabwe 202.4
3 Greece 175
4 Italy 133  Italy debt
5 Iceland 130.5
6 Portugal 127.8  Portugal debt
7 Ireland 124.2  Ireland debt
8 Jamaica 123
9 Lebanon 120
10 Cyprus 113
11 Sudan 111
12 Grenada 110
13 Singapore 105.5
14 Eritrea 104.7
15 Belgium 102.4
16 Puerto Rico 96.5
17 Spain 93.7  Spain debt
18 France 93.4  France debt
19 Egypt 92.2
20 United Kingdom 91.1  UK debt
21 Barbados 90.5
22 Antigua and Barbuda 89
23 Canada 86.3  Canada debt
24 Cabo Verde 86.2
25 Saint Kitts and Nevis 83
26 Germany 79.9
27 Hungary 79.8
28 Jordan 79.1
29 Sri Lanka 78.4
30 Saint Lucia 77
31 Morocco 76.9
32 Austria 75.7
33 Malta 75
34 Belize 75
35 Netherlands 74.3
36 United States 71.8  US debt
37 Slovenia 71.7
38 Albania 70.5
39 Dominica 70
40 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 68
41 Israel 67
42 Aruba 67
43 Croatia 66.2
44 Sao Tome and Principe 65.5
45 Uruguay 62
46 El Salvador 62
47 Serbia 61.2
48 Bahrain 61.2
49 Guyana 59.9
50 Brazil 59.2
51 Syria 58.9
52 Mauritius 68
53 Finland 56.5
54 Fiji 56.2
55 Slovakia 55.5
56 Costa Rica 55
57 Pakistan 54.6
58 Malaysia 54.6
59 Kenya 53.5
60 Ghana 53.1
61 Montenegro 52.1
62 Seychelles 51.8
63 India 51.8
64 Tunisia 51
65 Malawi 50.8
66 Nicaragua 50
67 Ethiopia 50
68 Philippines 50
69 Czech Republic 48.8
70 Vietnam 48.2
71 Poland 48.2
72 Burundi 47.6
73 Yemen 47.1
74 Dominican Republic 47
75 Denmark 47
76 Mozambique 46.7
77 Laos 46.3
78 Bosnia and Herzegovina 45.9
79 Thailand 45.9
80 Argentina 45.8
81 South Africa 45.4
82 Cote d’Ivoire 45.2
83 Tanzania 42.7
84 United Arab Emirates 41.7
85 Sweden 41.5
86 Andorra 41.1
87 Honduras 40.6
88 Ukraine 40.6
89 Lithuania 40.2
90 Panama 39.8
91 Colombia 39.6
92 Latvia 39.2
93 Bhutan 38.9
94 Taiwan 38.9
95 Djibouti 38.6
96 Romania 38.6
97 Senegal 38.4
98 New Zealand 38.4
99 Armenia 37.7
100 Mexico 37.7
101 Trinidad and Tobago 37.1
102 Turkey 36.6
103 Georgia 36.3
104 Bolivia 36
105 Cuba 35.9
106 Korea, South 35.8
107 Hong Kong 35.6
108 Macedonia 34.3
109 Venezuela 34.2
110 Switzerland 33.8
111 Curacao 33.2
112 Australia 32.6
113 Congo, Republic of the 32.1
114 Zambia 31.8
115 Belarus 31.5
116 Sierra Leone 31.1
117 Guatemala 31
118 Bangladesh 30.9
119 Uganda 30.7
120 Qatar 30.6
121 Chad 30.5
122 Mali 30.5
123 Norway 30.1
124 Benin 29.7
125 Papua New Guinea 28.1
126 Nepal 28
127 Namibia 27.2
128 San Marino 25.8
129 Indonesia 24
130 Rwanda 23.5
131 Ecuador 23.2
132 Gabon 23
133 Luxembourg 22.9
134 China 22.4
135 Anguilla 20
136 Nigeria 19.3
137 Iran 18.7
138 Bulgaria 18.4
139 Botswana 17.9
140 Cameroon 16.7
141 Moldova 16.6
142 Paraguay 15.7
143 Kazakhstan 15.6
144 Peru 14.9
145 Angola 14.7
146 Chile 13.9
147 Algeria 13.2
148 Saudi Arabia 12.2
149 Equatorial Guinea 11
150 Kosovo 9
151 Russia 7.9
152 Uzbekistan 7.6
153 Azerbaijan 7.5
154 Gibraltar 7.5
155 Tajikistan 6.5
156 Kuwait 6.4
157 Estonia 6
158 Wallis and Futuna 5.6
159 Libya 4.8
160 Oman 4.4
161 Liberia 3.3

Sources:

 

Some selected levels of Public Sector debt in different countries:

Further Reading

Annual Government Borrowing

An important factor is not just cumulative national debt, but, the annual budget deficit. This annual deficit determines the rate of deterioration in the public sector debt.

The budget deficit is the total amount the government needs to borrow in a particular year.

Budget Deficits by Country in 2012

net -debt

This shows that the US has one of the highest budget deficits in the world.

 

External Debt

A different statistics is external debt, this the amount of debt a country owes to other countries. It includes both the private and public sector debt. See: list of external debt by country

Credit Ratings

Readers Question

102 Responses to List of National Debt by Country

  1. BC April 3, 2011 at 12:39 pm #

    a. Why is debt related to GDP?
    An employees debt is not related to their employers income.
    The important factor is government income to expenditure i.e. the deficit.
    b. the ‘national debt’ should be government, business and private debt.
    That would provide a different picture, and the reason why they do not publish it.

    • Dante December 4, 2012 at 6:19 am #

      External debts is what your government borrows from other countries. GDP is what your country produces. The ratio of what you owe others and what you produce is the same as the ratio of what you earn versus the loan you have with the bank. If you borrow $1000 from the bank and you earn $100 then the ratio of debt to income is 10 (1000/100). The relationship you had between your salary and employer’s debt is not a valid one.

  2. Penniless April 4, 2011 at 12:02 pm #

    If almost every nation has a deficit, can’t that debt be offset to some world credit system that allows each country to pay it back, interest free, over say 100 years?
    The burden of debt on today’s world population is far too big for us to pay off in our lifetime. There is so much poverty in the world and yet we have the people, skills and materials to fix that – we just don’t have the money!
    I thought the World Bank or the IMF was there to help countries balance their budgets, but I guess they too have run out of money.
    There must be a fix for this; after all it’s just numbers in a computer.

  3. Sarang Semut April 11, 2011 at 7:01 am #

    Know about indonesia??

  4. Fraser May 8, 2011 at 2:59 am #

    How is it that Bulgaria have got such a low Public Debt???????? I mean, most countries that low have vast natural resources, or have taxed so much that they have been achieving little or negative growth, but look at http://www.indexmundi.com/bulgaria/public_debt.html and you see that they were lowering public debt and achieving growth at the same time…. MAKES NO SENSE!!!!!

  5. Allan June 30, 2011 at 3:04 am #

    When all countries have a national debt, a public debt,external debt, just who do they owe this debt to? if it is each other they are all in debt so borrowing from one to another makes no sense except to increase the existing debt.
    One would assume that the basis for credit creation the multiple upon a real unemcumbered deposit has disapeared and been replaced with debt upon debt, and as all new loans are new money this also means credit creation upon saturated debt, a bubble of world wide debt waiting for the pinprick.

  6. Peter July 7, 2011 at 2:28 am #

    It’s funny that the US only has a 58.9% debt… The IMF came up with 92.7% debt for the US in 2010!!! 92.7!! But then again I think these numbers would ruin US’ plan to make the dollar strong again, since they are using this very excuse to come after Greece, Ireland and Portugal and, by consequence, the Euro. Somehow (not surprisingly) the country with the greatest debt in the history of this planet, manages to get (near) top marks from the rating agencies that control the market (lets not forget the nationality of said agencies…). You (US) are trying to take the EURO down, but I believe sooner rather than later Europe is going to open its eyes and finally see you for what you really are: a bunch of selfish bastards that will stop at nothing to get richer, even if it means destroying entire economies, entire countries.

  7. FROM DEBTOCRACY TO DEMOCRACY July 11, 2011 at 11:08 pm #

    If all the countries are in debt ……… then no one is in debt…. lol

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/jul/09/greece-debtocracy

  8. camboy August 1, 2011 at 2:10 pm #

    I do not ac acambodia on the list…..do they have NO dept?????

  9. camboy August 1, 2011 at 2:11 pm #

    I meen Cambodia….

  10. Rod August 2, 2011 at 5:52 am #

    Who gives a Ducks Dick were you are on the list, you should be worried about what you are going to do when you wake up one morning to find your life savings have been turned into government Bonds or food stamps, or you might need to take a wheel barrow to the bank to take home enough money to feed the family for a day.

  11. Dominik Pigeon September 20, 2011 at 10:55 pm #

    Canada’s total public debt is in the 80%. The difference between the 34% and the 84% shown in the 2 sources is the provincial debts. Canada’s federal system is decentralized. The provinces assume now approximately 75% of health costs with little control, a bit like in the US, and with the population getting older, they make huge deficits.
    The federal Canadian government increases its debt by 5 billion $ per month as of the summer 2011. Quebec, a province representing about 22% of Canadian GDP adds 10 billion $ a year currently.
    In total, public debt increases between 5 to 6% of Canadian GDP per year at the current rhythm.

  12. Nursing Journals Online September 30, 2011 at 4:41 pm #

    You know I am surprised that the U.S. is not higher on this list. We know Greece has been in the news recently for economic troubles. Japan though was a shocker!

  13. Asd July 21, 2012 at 12:46 am #

    This website can not be serious!

    These data are not serious!

    Greece is the worst, and it is the Greeks fault because they don’t pay their taxes.
    And Italians are the second worst because they are lazy and talk too much instead of working.
    And Spanish are the 3rd worst because they have siesta.

    Germans, British, Americans, and Japanese are hard working, pay their taxes, and also more intelligent and superior.

    Therefore it is not possible Greeks and Italians having much less debt in net numbers in comparison to UK and Germany.

    If Greece has 160 b without paying taxes

    And UK has 1.3 tri by working hard

    And Germany has 2.6 tri by working hard and paying taxes

    it doesn’t make sense…

    The numbers are fake!

    • voiceofwisdom August 21, 2012 at 9:06 am #

      the thing is, just because germany the uk the usa and japan are more productive, they can loan more, so they are able to have a more bloated state leeching of the productive. hence im an anarchist

    • Tereza August 29, 2012 at 4:24 pm #

      Greeks according to OAECD are the most hard workers within EU..they work much more than the Germans on a weekly basis…So do the Portuguese…Debt hasnt got to do with lazyness..and Yes Japan and USA have the largest debts in the world..and it doesnt surprise me at all

    • Dante December 4, 2012 at 6:10 am #

      You are not being a bit racist here? You maybe forgetting the actual number of people that live (or bludge, according to you) in the countries you decided to denegrate.

      I don’t know who you are but I can tell from your comments that your country IQ, whatever it is now, will improve once you leave.

    • Nat Talarico February 10, 2013 at 7:48 am #

      Many morons who write on these boards do not do any research in the case of the USA 54% of taxes collected is directed to the American WAR Machine the Countries that you wrote about were sucked in to support the war in Iraq taking valuable money from the very needy to support you are either with us or you are against us, the IMF is good at assisting countries into debt watch these youtube videos and educate your self.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oARBdBtGenM

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTbdnNgqfs8

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAqG51uwzMI&feature=related

    • nia March 25, 2013 at 9:00 am #

      so true, italians are so lazy and arrogant. They stick to their mamas bums.

    • leyteris April 8, 2013 at 2:41 pm #

      No the numbers say the truth. Everyone cuts paper for money without giving any excuse and all the borrowers must pay their taxes. U.S Germany and U.K are the worst governments in the planet and we have to pay for their sins!!! That is the truth!!!

  14. Truthbetold December 3, 2012 at 2:44 pm #

    The interesting thing on this List is not the countries on Top, but the bottom line.
    This is the reason Gaddafi was killed. It’s as easy. The new Government in Libya immidiately installed another Banking system and now Libya is fucked like the Rest of us, working for Banks 24/7 cause of excessive interest.

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